teapotsahoy:

audrey-molinatti-art:

Here’s a recap of the alternate universe “if sailor moon were set in a art nouveau paris 1900 world. 

I wish to have time to do maybe 3 more like this 

HELP I AM HAVING SO MANY FEELINGS BAOUT THIS I CANT EVEN

(via karenhealey)

http://laurendestefano.tumblr.com/post/98853366825/losing-weight-is-really-hard-im-not-making

laurendestefano:

Losing weight is really hard. I’m not making excuses. I’m not blaming genes or medication. I’m merely listing weight loss as a valid struggle that people deal with. One day, as we watched a weight loss show on TV, a friend, who has always been thin, asked me sincerely why it was so hard for people…

kendrawcandraw:

Nimona ended today and you should read it

kendrawcandraw:

Nimona ended today and you should read it

(via gingerhaze)

RANT: WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO TEACH YOUR DAUGHTER?

dukeofbookingham:

So, something happened at work today that honestly made me so angry I had to vent about it somewhere, and Tumblr seemed like the perfect venue. Before I start, let me go ahead and say that this is all my personal opinion and is in no way representative of the opinions of my employer(s).

Cool, so…

This article I wrote last year, about a similar experience, is relevant here. 

I seriously question any parent who would prefer their child read about sexual violence than sexual consent.

shadesofamethyst:

lickystickypickyshe:

The Turkish company Pugedon has recently introduced a vending machine that’s an innovative way to help both the environment and our furry friends. It releases food for the city’s stray dogs and cats every time a plastic bottle is deposited, and it allows people to empty their water bottles for the animals as well.

This wonderful service operates at no charge to the city because the recycled plastic pays for the cost of food. So, with a little financial investment, the simple machines do a lot of good. They provide a steady source of sustenance to the animals, many of which rely on caring residents to regularly feed them. It also encourages people to make a habit of recycling and help conserve our environment for future generations.

Put these everywhere

(Source: mymodernmet.com, via galaxiesbeyond)

Anonymous said: i know its a weird question, but were there gay couples ion Godspeed? I know that there were straight couples, but were there openly gay characters too?

There were not—because it wasn’t allowed. I always wanted to make this storyline a little more obvious, but it wasn’t something that fit with the overall story in a way that worked organically. 

I do hint in Across the Universe that there were some “unnaturals” that were corrected in the Hospital and with Phydus—this is one of those cases. Because the survival of the ship relied on the reproduction of offspring, Eldest and Doc ensured that any homosexuals were drugged into heterosexual submission. 

Another way I tried to show this was with the short story, “Night Swimming,” published in the Defy the Dark anthology. That story is told from a gender-ambiguous narrator’s point of view, from someone who is in love with Kayleigh, Harley’s girlfriend. I left it ambiguous, but in my mind, that narrator was Victria. My personal backstory was that Victria was a lesbian, knew her feelings for Kayleigh were unrequited, knew that if she exposed her homosexuality she would be at risk (remember, she wasn’t on Phydus), and focused her attraction on someone who was safe and couldn’t possibly return her feelings (Orion). This was originally a major plot point in A Million Suns, but I ended up changing who the villain of the story was, and much of this backstory was subsequently cut. I wrote “Night Swimming” as a way to bring that story back in.

Obviously, as soon as Elder stopped Phydus distribution, the homosexual members of Godspeed would have a greater awareness of who they really were and who they wanted to be and be with. And Elder would certainly have done nothing to prevent people from being who they wanted to be. 

Anonymous said: hey beth! when your new book comes out, how long will it take to arrive to europe?

If you can read English, you should be able to get it almost immediately. If you want it translated into your language, please let the publishers in your country know! They are the ones who can purchase the translation rights and make it happen. 

thegirlwithsunsethair said: Since reading your Across the Universe trilogy and I just can't get enough of sci-fi! :D So I was wondering if you had any sci-fi book recommendations?

Try

  • Cinder by Marissa Meyers
  • These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner
  • Black Hole Sun by David McInnis Gill
  • Salvage by Alexandra Duncan
  • Starglass by Phoebe North

Anonymous said: I've really been enjoying Paper Hearts. Thank you so much for taking the time to pass on what you've learned. Could you write a little bit about navigating relationships with your fellow writers? What do you do if you've outgrown one of your critique partners? Especially if that person has become a very close friend? I worry about resentment as things are really starting to happen for me, and she's remained at the same level. And how do I best support those who are going on to publish?

If you’ve outgrown a crit partner (and it happens—it happened to me more than once!), then you have to treat it like a job. Writing IS a job—if you want to make a career out of it, you have to treat it as such, even if you’re not getting paid yet. Be civil, but firm, and break off a crit partnership that’s not working. 

I typically would ask for a query + 50 pages before querying, to get an idea of the other author’s skill level and her crit style on my work. If we looked like we could work together, we did. If not, we both walked away. This method worked a lot, and helped avoid bad situations. But I did withdraw from a crit group in part because of one specific person who I clashed with. 

If it’s your close friend, stay a friend! Just don’t swap pages any more. 

The best way to help others who are being published is to tell others about the book. You can do this with social media or reviews or just telling a friend. And you can do this merely by giving a shout out to the author that you’re happy for her!

sarahb372 said: This might be a little vague, but how did you get a publisher to take a look at your work? Did you know the right person, the right person gave your name to someone else, did you pester and pester, etc?

If you want a traditional publishing career, you need an agent. To get an agent, you write a manuscript, and you make it as perfect as possible. Then you send a query. If the query is good enough, the agent will read the manuscript. If the manuscript is good enough, she’ll sign you. Then the agent sends your book to a publisher. If it’s marketable, they’ll buy it. If it’s not…they won’t. Repeat until publication; repeat again for more publication. 

It’s not about connections. It’s never about pestering. It’s about writing a book that’s both good and marketable. 

black-and-white-cove said: Are you currently writing any new books? I really hope so, you're awesome!

I am! The Body Electric comes out next week, and I’m working on more after that :) 

''Beth writes and christens her novels
with the tears of her readers. Strangely, I'm
OK with this.''
-Jazmin Labrada
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